Cosmo Bag Sew Along: Step #12

Ok, so I got ahead of myself in my last post… in Step #12, we’re making the little button hole tab and we’ll attach it to our lining *before* we attach the lining to the bag exterior.  This way, our ratty ends will be tucked in nicely into the seam!  I also have to add a little caveat here… I’m hoping that I have recounted my Cosmo Bag steps in the correct order and the way they are segmented.  My Amy Butler’s Style Stitches book is still buried in one of my totally GINORMOUS plastic bins and I won’t have time to unpack them until this weekend.

(I’ll post pictures of these gigantic bins and you’ll see how I suffered a little bit of shame when my movers moved a single girl with a cat into a gigantic Texas-sized two bedroom apartment… with THAT MUCH fabric.  And books… they definitely griped about the heavy boxes of books.)

The first thing we do for creating the tab, is to locate our long rectangular piece.  It’s hard to imagine how this will become a tab with a button hole, but it really works!

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

You’ll need to determine your true center, so you will want to finger press your rectangle in half, lengthwise, just a shown in the following picture.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Go ahead and press this center fold with your steam iron so that you get a nice, crisp, clean line.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Then, you’ll open that back out and use your iron to press each long end in toward that center line.  It should look like the following picture after you press both long edges.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Press this in half on that center line one more time so that you end up with a narrow, long rectangle.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Now we’re going to top stitch down both long edges… remember to back stitch!

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Here’s where is starts to get tricky…  If you do this wrong the first time, never fear!  You can always rip out your stitches and re-do your work.  If it makes you feel any better, I hadn’t made this bag in a while and had to rip out my stitches and re-do all my photographs.  (Meh, it happens.)  Hopefully the following pictures will help fool-proof this just a little more for you!

You’re going to create the loop by folding the long rectangle in half.  It’s really helpful to have your pins handy along with your seam gauge (or other small ruler) and some chalk or water soluble pencil.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

You’re going to fold your rectangular piece so that it creates a triangle with a little gap in the pointed end.  It should look like the following picture.  As you can see, I also marked 2.75″ which is where our stitch line is going to stop.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Then, I pin the edges together because we’re going to stitch a really tiny seam.  You can overlap your fabric a little more if you like… Amy Butler really doesn’t give much guidance in this area.  So, I’ll reiterate:  If you aren’t happy with the amount of fabric overlapping on your tab, go ahead and rip out the stitches and re-do them.  Just remember to be gentle around your top stitching!

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

I then like to stitch right on top of my existing top stitch line so that it looks a little cleaner.  It’s REALLY imperative that you back stitch on this short seam.  Remember, a button is going to go through this hole and if your bag is carrying anything heavy, your tab will take some strain from the button.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

To make the point of the tab and the natural button hole that is created in the non-stitched gap, first press down with your finger as you see in the following picture.  I found it was sufficient to finger press this and secure it with a pin or two.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Then, you’ll stitch a very short line (back stitching is important, again!) and I like to stitch right on top of the existing top stitch line to keep it looking clean.  When you’re finished, give the pointed tip a quick press with your steam iron.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Now we need to shorten the square end, so we’re going to make a quick gathering stitch.  I like to use a long basting stitch, leaving my thread ends long on both ends (*no* back stitching here!), pulling on the bobbin threads until it measures 1.5″.  Secure the long ends by wrapping them around pins at either end in a figure 8 pattern.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

On the exterior bag, pick either side and pin the tab to the center between the handle bases, just as shown in the following picture.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

Baste the tab to the exterior of the bag, back stitching at both ends so that the basting stitches don’t unravel on you during the next step.  Baste only 1/4″ because our final stitch line will be 1/2″ and this basting will then be tucked into the seam.

Amy Butler Cosmo Bag step 12

In the next step, we will attach the exterior to the lining (for real, this time!) and you’re going to be surprised at how quickly this whole thing comes together!

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  • Cosmo Bag Sew Along: Step #13 : School of Moxie - […] the exterior and the lining should be touching each other.  Make sure the button tab we made in Step #12 is tucked down in between the lining and […]ReplyCancel

  • Sharon - I’m trying to figure out which side of this tab goes toward the bag! I can’t tell from your picture and the books directions are poorly written, not to mention the pale ink, making it nearly unreadable.ReplyCancel

    • Mary Ann Williams - You know what… I never figured that out either! 🙂 I usually take a look at the tab I just made and see if one side looks more like a right side than a wrong side and I just roll with it. I don’t think you can go wrong either way!ReplyCancel

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